Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Green is the New Black

Goths celebrating Earth Day? That's for hippies, right? Not for us brazen post-punk mourners, right? WRONG! Well, in my opinion, anyway. So, in typically belated blogger fashion, I thought I'd make a little post of a few Goth-appropriate ways to be kind to the planet:


The first thing that immediately comes to mind is to reduce the effect purchasing our clothes have on our environment. Buying at smaller, local retainers reduces the carbon footprint caused by transportation and cuts down on large-scale factory production's pollutants. Home sewing is also a method you can employ to avoid polluting the environment by buying from big box stores. If you've got some cash to throw around, you can also make an investment in sewing off the grid, or buying a sewing machine that doesn't run on electrical power.

If you can't sew and smaller stores are too expensive, thrifting is pretty fantasticaly eco-friendly. Reducing the consumption of raw materials by reusing and recycling old garments is relatively cheap, super Goth-appropriate, and fun. And you can thrift more than clothes! Furniture and home decor are huge areas of thrift stores and there's so much you can do with a little bit of paint.

(Bonus tip: When washing clothes that you bring back from thrift stores, wash them in cold water. The cold water will preserve the color of the clothes better and when the water isn't heated up you save energy--and money!)



Reducing pollutants isn't the only way to help the Earth, you can also reduce the impact you have on the creatures that share the planet with us. Researching which cosmetic and hygiene products test on animals and then consciously avoiding those brands is a great place to start. I was disappointed to hear that Urban Decay, a long-standing vegan and cruelty-free brand of makeup, was being bought by a company which tests on animals, but they aren't the only option! Check Etsy for great options!

(Bonus tip: Avoiding aerosol hairsprays or only using a little bit ill definitely improve your teasing skills and the atmosphere.)

I'm sure you're sick of hearing RECYCLE but let me tell you that RECYCLING is still pretty important. Unfortunately, the recycling business isn't perfect, but there is more you can do at home. Saving fabric and paper scraps from larger projects for other ones is a fantastic way to keep them from ending up in a land fill.

(Bonus tip: If you want to make pillows or something similar, instead of buying the filler from a big-box store, visit a thrift store and buy a bunch of t-shirts to shred up instead. Therapeutic and eco-friendly!)

What are your guys tips for living an eco-friendly but spooky life?

15 comments:

  1. Great post and ideas! I LOVE thrifting, and get quite a lot of 'new' clothes that way. And we recycle as much as possible; I give most of our recyclables to a co-worker who donates all the money she gets to her daughter's school.

    You can also use cut-up old t-shirts for shop/paint rags, and stuff pillows with old pantyhose. If you're worried about putting them in the dryer, just put a zipper in the pillow, then remove the pantyhose stuffing before washing/drying.

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    1. Thank you! There are a lot of things to do with old t-shirts, it seems!

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  2. I use the stuffing from old pillows to make new ones. Then you can use the fabric casing for other things - like paint rags and such!

    I definitely recycle and I try to re-purpose just about everything I own.

    I've also got a green thumb so I plant stuff in my mom's garden and I'm part of the Arbor Day Foundation!

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    1. Working in foundations like the Arbor Day Foundation is a fantastic idea! Definitely a nice way to give back to communities and the planet.

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  3. All my make-up is eco-friendly. I wear Emani, except for eyeliner, which changes based on what company is carrying liquid or gel. I also am sure to check all my beauty products for parabans and phthalates.

    I've found some amazing things at thrift stores. I've always wondered, these clothes had to have been in a regular store at one point. What haven't I seen them before?

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    1. I suppose we can't be everywhere at once! And who knows, they might have come from far-off places. :)

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  4. A lovely post. I've always thought that alternative fashions are more readily adaptable to more sustainable life styles f for no other reason than the members are willing to work a little harder to achieve the right look. It is less of an effort to add looking for eco-friendly clothes and accessories too.

    There are often good craft supplies at the thrift store. Things that don't immediately scream "goth!" but with a little dye, tea or work become delightfully offbeat. Thrift stores are also a good place to go for fun gifts. They're sure to be unique.

    Not exactly gothic, but now that summer is around the corner, farmers markets offer great produce for reasonable prices. You can eat healthier
    and reduce your carbon foot print by buying food that hasn't been transported thousands of miles to reach your grocery shelf.

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    1. Thank you! I think you make an excellent point.

      I considered making a section in this post about food but, as you said, not exactly gothic. :)

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  5. I totally hear you about the sewing part of your post. I have a treadle machine and using it is so much fun. I've also been taking apart or altering thrift store purchases to keep my fabric hoarding at a minimum. I've also promised myself to buy mostly natural fiber fabric (if I can't help myself) Fabrics with natural content are a little more expensive, so I don't buy much, I really have to think about it and assign a project for the yardage. So far, so good.

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    1. The effort for buying more expensive fabric and being super careful with how you plan it is probably well worth it! Not only is it better for the environment, but it's a great way to become a better project planner and sewer!

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  6. I became much more eco-friendly when I moved to Korea, mostly by default. I live in a small apartment, have no car, and recycle. However, because my Korean still isn't good, I can't read the labels on food or makeup to determine what is in it or how it's produced, which is pretty frustrating.

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    1. That is really frustrating. Can you google the products and find english translations online?

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  7. I'm a big fan of thrifting. I don't get to do it very often though, because there aren't any thrift stores in my part of The Netherlands, so I usually only get the chance when I'm in Amsterdam (which isn't very often).

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  8. Hi, Mary. Google directed me here when I was researching about Earth Day stuff and I tagged your blog link in my blog here http://skullsneyeballs.blogspot.com/2015/04/earth-day-goths-can-go-green-too.html . You have great ideas :)

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  9. Great post! It’s really about time to give Mother Nature some extra love.

    Mariz
    AB&T Diesel

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